Paying back to the Aviation Community – CADORS Analytics

As most of my friends know (because I keep telling them) I am a private pilot. And as some of my pilots’ friends know, I’m a data analyst. When you mix those two things together you get what? Data!

Here in Canada, we have an aviation system called CADORS – Civil Aviation Daily Occurrence Reporting System. Per Transport Canada definition:

“The purpose of the system is to provide initial information on occurrences involving any Canadian-registered aircraft as well as events which occur at Canadian airports, in Canadian sovereign airspace, or international airspace for which Canada has accepted responsibility that includes events involving foreign registered aircraft.

Transport Canada endeavors to ensure the accuracy and integrity of the data contained within CADORS, however, the information within should be treated as preliminary, unsubstantiated and subject to change.

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada is the official source of aviation accident and incident data in Canada.

I receive daily emails from the CADORS system with the list of occurrences that happen daily in my region. Most of them are not incidents or accidents but occurrences like an airport tower that was closed, a plane that had to overshoot because of bad weather, a plane that had to divert to an alternate airport because of bad weather, etc. But they do also include any crashes, fatalities, and injuries.
And it bothers me that we have no statistics over this data, just a huge list of each occurrence with all its details. The TSB does have statistics available, which I believe they compile from the same CADORS data as I, and they make it available monthly here: http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/stats/aviation/index.asp. But their reports only account for actual crashes. Removing all other daily occurrences from the mix. (fun fact: I only found out about the TSB statistics while writing this post. I did search for this data in the coolest government website: Statistics Canada, but could not find there. Good thing is I did compare our data and they do match)

So I decided to make my own reports and make them available to the public. I’m using the publicly available CADORS data and update the data is updated daily. This is still a work in progress and eventually, I want to have the same reports/graphs/analysis that the TSB makes available on their monthly/yearly reports. So keep checking this and you will soon see some cool new stuff.

The data is available through the following link: http://www.dataaddiction.ca/cadors-analytics/ or through the new “CADOR Analytics”  link in the top menu of this site.

Have fun playing with the data and let me know what you think or any suggestions.

 

 

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